Rise Of Fascism In Japan Essay

Rise Of Fascism And Communism In Europe

In the 1930s the rise of fascism and communism in Europe and the expansion of the German and Italian empire and also the expansion of Japanese empire in Asia saw the United States move from a policy of isolationism to supporting traditional allies and defending democracy. The United States became directly involved in World War 2 after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour.

The rise of fascism in Europe began when Germany turned to Adolf Hitler, an extremist. The Fascists, under Benito Mussolini, became powerful in the 1930s. Mussolini was able to make the country come together and wanted to gain back the territory that Germany had lost from the Treaty of Versailles. Communism had started to rise when Joseph Stalin took over the Soviet Communist Party. In July 1939, the Soviet Union, under the leadership of Stalin, signed a Non-Aggression Pact with Germany. Germany no longer had the fear of having to fight a war on two fronts. Both communism and fascism were seen as potential threats to democracy. Germany, Italy joined in an alliance with Japan. By 1941, they had expanded their empire. Germany had invaded Poland. Italy launched an invasion of Egypt, Sudan and North Africa. In the Pacific, Japan was becoming successful and extended its empire into China and French Indo-China. Not only were they threats to democracy and balance of world power but to economic interests of Britain, USA, France and Holland. By 1941 Britain were under threat.

The United States involvement in World War 2 was not inevitable as initially the U.S adopted a policy of isolationism. When Franklin Roosevelt became president, he pledged that the United States would become 'the good neighbour' in world affairs. This meant that 'no state has the right to intervene in the internal or external affairs or another'. The declaration of isolationism was made to try and stop the United States becoming involved in World War 2. Pacifists and people who believed that the U.S should never become involved in any kind of war were known as 'Isolationists' and they supported...

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Essay about Mussolini And Fascism

1549 Words7 Pages

     Fascism is the philosophy that exercises a dictatorship through the use of violence. There are two main areas fascism deals with. An elitist approach that makes the peoples' will on a select group with a supreme leader who governs all. The other approach is the populist approach in which the government wishes to have all its people act out against the government's oppressors. (Baradat) Fascism came from the word fasces, a bundle of sticks that were bound to an ax, which was supposed to represent "civic unity and the authority of the Roman officials to punish wrongdoers," (www.funkandwagnall.com)
There were three main philosophers who helped to shape the fascist theory, George Sorel, Friedrich…show more content…

There seemed to be a large change in politics and socialism that were brought about by the declining social, economic, and political conditions of the country. (Baradat) Benito Mussolini was at the time the answer to these problems with his fascist views. He had started out as a Marxist following his father but turned his sights on fascism around 1914. (www.funkandwagnalls.com)
Mussolini was born in Predappio, Romagna July 29th 1883. In 1901 he became a schoolmaster but was unable to find a permanent job. He was also arrested for vagrancy and returned to Italy were he did his military service. (gi.grolier.com) There he was promoted to sergeant but unfortunately was injured during grenade drills and returned to his position as editor of the newspaper "Avanti" in 1917. (Baradat) As editor he gained valuable experience in propaganda which became very helpful in later days. (Gi.grolier.com)
In 1919 Mussolini along with several veterans founded the Fasci de Combattimento, meaning combat group. This movement appealed to many of the lower middle class and it to took its name from the fasces. In 1922 Mussolini led his grand march on Rome where he then seised power of Italy from a willing king. At first Mussolini ruled over Italy constitutionally but by 1924 he changed his tune and established a totalitarian regime. (Baradat) Mussolini had no real

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