Nationalist Congress Party Essay

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The Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) is a political party in India. Its youth wing is the Nationalist Youth Congress.

History[edit]

The NCP was formed on 25 May 1999, by Sharad Pawar, P. A. Sangma, and Tariq Anwar after they were expelled from the Indian National Congress (INC) on 20 May 1999, for disputing the right of Italian-born Sonia Gandhi to lead the party.[6] At the time of formation of the NCP, the Indian Congress (Socialist) party merged with the new party [7]. Despite the NCP being founded on opposition to the leadership of Sonia Gandhi, it has formed coalitions with the Congress party to form a government on numerous occasions at the state level as well at the federal level. On 20 June 2012, P. A. Sangma quit the NCP to contest in presidential polls.[8]

Party symbol[edit]

The Election Symbol of NCP is an analogue clock that reads 10:10.[9] The clock is drawn in blue and has two legs and an alarm button. It is situated on a tri-coloured Indian flag[10]

Ideology[edit]

According to its website, the NCP is committed to ideals of social justice, expressing support for affirmative action policies for the downtrodden members of society and for ensuring equal opportunities for all. The NCP also believes in the principle of secularism, which they define as "fraternity amongst followers of different faiths." They believe in a decentralised government structure and in upholding a society without discrimination or prejudice. However, its self-proclaimed "cardinal principle" is to "strengthen India as a sovereign, socialist, secular, and democratic republic" as well as securing "justice, liberty, equality and fraternity" among Indian citizens.

Presence in Various States[edit]

Though primarily based in the state of Maharashtra, the NCP has gradually gained prominence in states such as Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Lakshadweep, Assam, Gujarat, Bihar, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh and West Bengal.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Nationalist Congress Party (NCP), national political party in India. The NCP has described itself as a “millennial party with a modern and progressive orientation” with an ideology of “holistic democracy,” “Gandhian secularism,” and “federalism based national unity.” It has called for a “democratic secular society wedded to equality and social justice.”

The NCP was formally established in June 1999 in New Delhi by three former members of the Indian National Congress (Congress Party)—Sharad Pawar, Purno Sangma, and Tariq Anwar—after they had been expelled from that party for demanding that only a person born in India should be allowed to become the country’s president, vice president, or prime minister. The issue arose after Sonia Gandhi, the Italian-born widow of former prime minister Rajiv Gandhi, became leader of the Congress Party and thus ordinarily would become the candidate for prime minister if the party were to gain a parliamentary majority and form a government. Pawar was elected president of the NCP, and Sangma and Anwar became its general secretaries. None of the NCP’s election manifestos, however, has highlighted the foreigner issue.

The NCP had its greatest electoral success in Maharashtra state. In the first election it contested there, for the state legislative assembly in 1999, it came in third, with 58 seats won out of 223 seats contested. It then allied itself with the Congress Party (which won 75 seats) to form a coalition government in the state. The alliance between the two parties continued in subsequent state and national elections, and the NCP became part of the Congress-led United Progressive Alliance (UPA) coalition government in 2004 (which chose Manmohan Singh to be prime minister after Sonia Gandhi elected not to run).

The NCP’s political influence in Maharashtra reached a high point in the 2004 assembly polls, when it won 71 of the 124 seats it contested (compared with the 69 seats won by Congress). In the 2009 state elections, however, the NCP total dropped to 62 of 114 seats contested, while Congress rebounded, garnering 82 seats. However, the two parties still retained enough seats to continue their coalition government.

The NCP’s performance in states other than Maharashtra and at the national level was much lower. In elections for the Goa state legislative assembly in 2007, the NCP captured three seats, but it won no seats in the state’s 2012 assembly elections. At the national level, the party won eight seats in the Lok Sabha (lower chamber of the Indian parliament) in 1999 and nine seats in both the 2004 and 2009 elections. However, the party received only a small proportion of the nationwide vote (1.8 percent in 2004, which improved slightly to about 2 percent in 2009), and 45 of 46 candidates that the party put forward for seats in states other than Maharashtra lost in 2009. The party did slowly increase its number of seats in the Rajya Sabha (upper chamber of parliament), from four in the 2006 election to seven in the 2010 and 2012 contests, but it suffered a setback in the 2014 Lok Sabha polls, when its representation there was reduced to six seats.

Some of the NCP’s relative weakness nationally was the result of defections from the party’s ranks. One group broke with the party in Kerala in 2002 (although another party merged with the NCP there in 2006), and another faction split off from it in Chhattisgarh in 2004. Perhaps most damaging were the actions of founder Purno Sangma, who pulled his Meghalaya-based faction out of the NCP in 2004. He later returned to the party, but in 2012 he again left the NCP to run for the presidency of India after Pawar threw the support of the NCP behind Pranab Mukherjee, the UPA’s candidate. Sangma lost to Mukherjee by a wide margin, and in early 2013 he formed the National People’s Party.

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