Banff Cochrane Mla Bibliography

MP Brian Storseth and Sun News talking head Ezra Levant.

With a provincial election expected in the next few months, the 43-year long governing Progressive Conservatives are expected to have all their candidates nominated by the end of March 2015 and be in a position to trigger an election soon after. The opposition parties are far behind in the candidate selection process.

The Progressive Conservative nomination in Lac La Biche-St. Paul-Two Hills took a strange twist last week. The Lac La Biche Post reports that Brian Storseth, who is retiring from an unremarkable three-terms as a Conservative backbencher Member of Parliament in Ottawa, is seeking the PC nomination and his late candidacy came as the local PC nominating committee was thrown out over closing nominations too early.

Shayne Saskiw

According to the Post, in the nomination contest Mr. Storseth is facing his own step-mother Joanne Penner, former Lakeland County councillor Jeff Dechaine, current St. Paul Mayor Glenn Anderson, and St. Paul area school board executive Darrell Younghans. The current MLA for this constituency is Wildroser Shayne Saskiw, who is the husband of Shannon Stubbs, the Conservative candidate replacing Mr. Storseth in the next federal election.

Here are some other updates that I have added to the list of nomination candidates:

Banff-Cochrane: Registered Nurse Cam Westhead is seeking the New Democratic Party nomination. Mr. Westhead is also a district representative with United Nurses of Alberta.

Calgary-Bow: Two candidates are seeking the PC nomination to replace retiring MLA Alana DeLong. Former City Council candidate Chris Harper and lawyer Byron Nelson will contest the nomination scheduled for March 7, 2015. Mr. Nelson was seeking the PC nomination in Calgary-Fish Creek until Ms. DeLong announced her retirement. On Dec. 4, 2014, Mr. Harper announced that he had left the PC Party because of Premier Jim Prentice‘s approach to Gay-Straight Alliances in Alberta schools. It appears he has now rejoined.

Bob Turner

Calgary-CrossJesse Minhas and Dan Sidhu are seeking the PC nomination to replace retiring MLA Yvonne Fritz. Ms. Fritz was first elected in 1993.

Calgary-Mountain View: Former PC MLA Mark Hlady will challenge Jean-Sebastien Rioux for the PC nomination. Mr. Hlady served as MLA for this constituency from 1993 until 2004, when he was unseated by current Liberal MLA and interim party leader David Swann.

Edmonton-Glenora: Philipia Bates Renouf, a judicial clerk in Alberta’s Department of Justice and a former Vice-President of the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, will challenge Public School Board Trustee Sarah Hoffman for the NDP nomination in Edmonton-Glenora.

Edmonton-McClung: Realtor Lorne Dach will represent the NDP in the next election. This will be Mr. Dach’s fourth time standing as the NDP candidate in this southwest Edmonton constituency.

Donna Wilson

Edmonton-Meadowlark: Former Globe & Mail reporter Katherine O’Neill is seeking the PC nomination in this west Edmonton constituency. Ms. O’Neill’s mother-in-law, Mary O’Neill, served as PC MLA for St. Albert from 1997 to 2004. Former Liberal leader Raj Sherman currently represents this constituency and is not seeking re-election.

Edmonton-Riverview: University of Alberta Nursing Professor Dr. Donna Wilson is seeking the Liberal nomination in Edmonton-Riverview. Dr. Wilson placed fourth as the Liberal candidate in last year’s Edmonton-Whitemud by-election. The Liberals represented Riverview from its creation in 1997 until 2012, when former leader Kevin Taft retired from politics.

Edmonton-Whitemud: NDP candidate Bob Turner is seeking a rematch against Health Minister Stephen Mandel in Edmonton-Whitemud. The University of Alberta doctor placed second in the September 2014 by-election with the NDP’s best-ever showing in that constituency.

Lethbridge-East: Former Lethbridge County Reeve Lorne Hickey will challenge Tammy Perlich for the PC nomination. Mr. Hickey was defeated by Liberal-turned-PC MLA Bridget Pastoor in the 2012 PC nomination. Ms. Pastoor is not seeking re-election.

Medicine Hat: Former Alderman John Hamill, 77, and realtor Jeff Lanigan will challenge Wildrose-turned-PC MLA Blake Pedersen for the PC nomination.

Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills: Olds Town Councillor Debbie Bennett and former Mountain View County councillor Ron Richardson joined Olds Councillor Wade Bearchell in the PC nomination race. Wildrose-turned-PC MLA Bruce Rowe is not seeking re-election after one-term in office.

Red Deer: Red Deer County Councillor Christine Moore is seeking the PC nomination in Red Deer-North and Red Deer College Business DeanDarcy Mykytyshyn is seeking the PC nomination inRed Deer-South.

Rimbey-Rocky Mountain House-Sundre: Wildrose-turned-Independent MLA Joe Anglin and ATB employee Tammy Cote will face former Lacombe County reeve Terry Engenfor the PC nomination.

Strathmore-Brooks
: Former lobby group spokespersonDerek Fildebrandt has been acclaimed as the Wildrose candidate.

The following PC candidates have been acclaimed: Terry Rock in Calgary-Buffalo, Jason Luan in Calgary-HawkwoodRic McIver in Calgary-Hays, Mike Ellis in Calgary-West, Diana McQueen in Drayton Valley-Devon, Stephen Mandel in Edmonton-WhitemudDon Scott in Fort McMurray-Conklin, Wayne Drysdale in Grande Prairie-Wapiti, Ian Donovan in Little Bow and Frank Oberle in Peace River.


I have added these updates to the list of nominees and nomination candidates planning to run in Alberta’s next general election. Please email david.cournoyer [at] gmail.com if there are additions to the list. Thank you.

This entry was posted in Alberta Politics and tagged Banff-Cochrane, Blake Pedersen, Bob Turner, Brian Storseth, Bridget Pastoor, Bruce Rowe, Byron Nelson, Calgary-Bow, Calgary-Cross, Calgary-Fish Creek, Calgary-Mountain View, Cam Westhead, Chris Harper, Christine Moore, Dan Sidhu, Darcy Mykytyshyn, Darrell Younghans, David Swann, Debbie Bennett, Derek Fildebrandt, Donna Wilson, Edmonton-Glenora, Edmonton-McClung, Edmonton-Meadowlark, Edmonton-Riverview, Edmonton-Whitemud, Glenn Anderson, Jean-Sebastien Rioux, Jeff Dechaine, Jeff Lanigan, Jesse Minhas, Joanne Penner, Joe Anglin, John Hamill, Katherine O'Neill, Kevin Taft, Lac La Biche-St. Paul-Two Hills, Lethbridge-East, Lorne Dach, Lorne Hickey, Mark Hlady, Mary O'Neill, Medicine Hat, Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills, Philipia Bates Renouf, Raj Sherman, Red Deer-North, Red Deer-South, Rimbey-Rocky Mountain House-Sundre, Ron Richardson, Sarah Hoffman, Shannon Stubbs, Shayne Saskiw, Stephen Mandel, Strathmore-Brooks, Tammy Perlich, Tamy Cote, Terry Engen, Wade Bearchell, Yvonne Fritz on by Dave Cournoyer.

Banff-Cochrane is a provincialelectoral district for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, Canada. This riding is home to the town of Banff and the popular tourist destination Banff National Park, environmental issues tend to dominate here.

The cost of living is significantly high especially in Canmore where there is a struggle to fill low wage service sector jobs, due to the high cost of living. Bears and wildlife encounters are also common in this riding, requiring extra attention to waste disposal. The area also has lots of ski resorts, a number of ranchers and farmers also make their home in the Alberta Foothills.

The riding was first created in 1940 out of the north half of the old Rocky Mountain riding, and the Cochrane riding. From 1975 to 1979 the riding was renamed Banff but was later reversed.

History[edit]

The electoral district has existed twice. The first iteration was created in the 1940 boundary redistribution from the ridings of Cochrane and Rocky Mountain. In 1975 the riding name was changed to Banff and it was set back to Banff-Cochrane in the 1977 redistribution.

The 2010 boundary redistribution saw Banff-Cochrane gain the land south of Cochrane that was in the old Foothills-Rocky View electoral district.[1]

Boundary history[edit]

45 Banff-Cochrane 2003 Boundaries[2]
Bordering Districts
NorthEastWestSouth
Rocky Mountain HouseFoothills-Rocky View, Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills, HighwoodnoneLivingstone-Macleod
riding map goes heremap in relation to other districts in Alberta goes here
Legal description from the Statutes of Alberta 2003, Electoral Divisions Act.
Starting at the intersection of the east boundary of Rge. 19 W5 and the east boundary of Banff National Park; then 1. in a generally southeasterly direction along the park boundary to the north boundary of Twp. 30; 2. east along the north boundary of the Twp. to the east boundary of Rge. 8 W5; 3. north along the east boundary of Rge. 8 W5 to the intersection with the right bank of the Red Deer River; 4. downstream along the right bank to the north boundary of Twp. 31; 5. east along the north boundary of the Twp. to the east boundary of Sec. 33 in Twp. 31, Rge. 6 W5; 6. south along the east boundary of Secs. 33, 28, 21 and 16 to the north boundary of Sec. 10 in the Twp.; 7. east along the north boundary of Secs. 10, 11 and 12 in the Twp. to the east boundary of Rge. 6; 8. south along the east boundary of Rge. 6 to the north boundary of Twp. 29, Rge. 6 W5; 9. west along the north boundary to the east boundary of Sec. 34; 10. south along the east boundary of Secs. 34 and 27 to the north boundary of Sec. 23 in the Twp.; 11. east along the north boundary of Sec. 23 to the east boundary of Sec. 23; 12. south along the east boundary to the north boundary of the south half of Sec. 24 in the Twp.; 13. east along the north boundary of the south half of Sec. 24 to the east boundary of the west half of Sec. 24; 14. south along the east boundary of the west half of Sec. 24 to the north boundary of Sec. 13; 15. east along the north boundary of Sec. 13 to the east boundary of Rge. 6 W5; 16. south along the east boundary of Rge. 6 to the north boundary of Sec. 12, Twp. 27, Rge. 6 W5; 17. west along the north boundary to the east boundary of Sec. 11; 18. south along the east boundary of Secs. 11 and 2 in Twp. 27 and the east boundary of Secs. 35, 26, and 23 in Twp. 26 to the west shore of the Ghost Lake Reservoir; 19. south along the west shore to the north boundary of Sec. 12 in the Twp.; 20. east along the north boundary of Sec. 12 to the southeast shore of the Ghost Lake Reservoir and the northeast boundary of the Stoney Indian Reserve No. 142, 143 and 144; 21. generally east and south along the Stoney Indian Reserve No. 142, 143 and 144 to the west town boundary of Cochrane (at the east boundary of Sec. 8 in Twp. 26, Rge. 4 W5); 22. north along the east boundary of Sec. 8 to the north boundary of Sec. 9; 23. east along the north boundary of Secs. 9, 10, 11 and 12 to the east boundary of Rge. 4 W5; 24. south along the east boundary of Rge. 4 W5 to the east town boundary of Cochrane; 25. south, west and north along the Cochrane town boundary to the east boundary of the Stoney Indian Reserve No. 142, 143 and 144; 26. westerly along the boundary of the Stoney Indian Reserve No. 142, 143 and 144 to the intersection with the east boundary of Rge. 6 W5; 27. south along the east boundary of Rge. 6 to the north boundary of Twp. 23 and the intersection with the east boundary of the Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve; 28. south and east along the east boundary of the Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve to the north boundary of Sec. 14 in Twp. 15, Rge. 3 W5 (Highway 532); 29. southwesterly along the boundary of the Cataract Creek Snow Vehicle Forest Land Use Zone described in Order In Council 998/79 to the east boundary of Rge. 6 W5; 30. south along the east boundary of Rge. 6 W5 to the north boundary of Twp. 13; 31. west along the north boundary of Twp. 13 to the Alberta-British Columbia boundary; 32. northwesterly along the boundary to its intersection with the north boundary of Twp. 32; 33. northeast along a projected line to the starting point.
Note:

Electoral history[edit]

The electoral district was created in the 1940 boundary redistribution primarily from the ridings of Cochrane and Rocky Mountain. The first representative to win the district was Independent candidate Frant Laut who defeated former Cochrane Social Credit incumbent William King in a hotly contested race.

Laut was defeated running for a second term in the 1944 general election by Social Credit candidate Arthur Wray. Two years into his term Wray was suspended the Social Credit caucus on February 20, 1946 for criticizing the Alberta government after requests to the Public Works department to remove snow from Cochrane roads was ignored.[4] The situation came to a head a year later when the Social Credit members passed a motion in the legislature to force Wray to move his desk to the opposition side of the house. His stand against cabinet won praise from his constituents in Cochrane.

The 1948 election would see a hotly contested battle as King and Laut attempt to regain their seat. Wray hung on to a second term in vote transfers. Wray would run for a third term in the 1952 election but would be defeated finishing a distant third by Social Credit candidate Lee Leavitt.

Leavitt was defeated by Frank Gainer who was one of two joint nominee's by the Progressive Conservative and Liberal parties in the 1955 election. He ran with the Coalition banner and sat in the legislature with it. Gainer won re-election in a hotly contested race in 1959. Pundits at the time figured he would be chosen to lead the four opposition members of different stripes with his Coalition banner, however no one was picked. He won a third term in 1963 before retiring in 1967.

The wide open race in 1967 saw Independent candidate Clarence Copithorne defeat Social Credit candidate Roy Wilson to win the district. Copithorne joined the Progressive Conservative caucus on April 15, 1971. He stood for reelection as a Progressive Conservative a few months later winning a strong plurality. He retired from provincial politics at dissolution in 1975.

In 1975 the riding name was changed to Banff before being changed back in 1979. Progressive Conservative candidate Greg Stevens held the district for three terms before retiring in 1993. He was replaced by Brian Evans for two terms. Janis Tarchuck the current representative was first elected in 1997 and has been re-elected for three more terms.

Legislature results 1940–1975[edit]

1940 general election[edit]

1944 general election[edit]

1944 Alberta general election results[6]Turnout 73.54%1st Count Swing
AffiliationCandidate1st%2nd%PartyPersonal
 Social CreditArthur Wray1,56838.51%1,80550.67%0.40%*
 IndependentFrank Laut1,60239.34%1,75749.33%*−21.72%
 Cooperative CommonwealthD. MacGregor90222.15%*
Total4,072100%3,562100%
Exhausted Ballots0510
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined118
5,698 eligible electors
 Social Credit pickup from Independent1st Count Swing 11.06%

1948 general election[edit]

1948 Alberta general election results[7]Turnout 58.17%1st Count Swing
AffiliationCandidate1st%2nd%PartyPersonal
 Independent Social CreditArthur Wray1,65841.58%1,96457.28%*3.07%
 IndependentFrank Laut1,24631.24%1,46542.72%*−8.10%
 Social CreditWilliam King1,08427.18%−11.33%*
Total3,988100%3,429100%
Exhausted Ballots0559
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined291
7,356 eligible electors
 Independent Social Credit hold from floor crossing1st Count Swing 5.59%

1952 general election[edit]

1952 Alberta general election results[8]Turnout 56.83%Swing
AffiliationCandidateVotes%PartyPersonal
Social CreditLee Leavitt1,84554.73%27.55%
 LiberalC.C. Mathews1,03530.70%*
 Independent Social CreditArthur Wray49114.57%*−27.01%
Total3,371100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined283
6,430 Eligible Electors
 Social Credit pickup from Independent Social CreditSwing 29.13%

1955 general election[edit]

1959 general election[edit]

1959 Alberta general election results[10]Turnout 63.23%Swing
AffiliationCandidateVotes%PartyPersonal
 CoalitionFrank Gainer2,27950.79%-4.08%
Social CreditRobin Echlin2,20849.21%4.08%
Total4,487
Rejected, spoiled and declined25
Eligible electors / Turnout7,136 %
 Coalition holdSwing −4.08%

1963 general election[edit]

1963 Alberta general election results[11]Turnout 63.58%Swing
AffiliationCandidateVotes%PartyPersonal
 CoalitionFrank Gainer2,17949.66%-1.13%
Social CreditVictor Watson1,87842.80%−6.41%
    NDPJack Fraser3317.54%*
Total4,388100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined12
6,921 Eligible Electors
 Coalition holdSwing −3.77%

1967 general election[edit]

1971 general election[edit]

Legislature results 1979–present[edit]

1979 general election[edit]

1982 general election[edit]

1986 general election[edit]

1989 general election[edit]

1993 general election[edit]

1997 general election[edit]

2001 general election[edit]

2004 general election[edit]

2008 general election[edit]

2012 general election[edit]

2015 general election[edit]

Senate nominee results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election results: Banff-Cochrane[25]Turnout 38.05%
AffiliationCandidateVotes% Votes% BallotsRank
Progressive ConservativeBert Brown3,18316.46%50.60%1
Progressive ConservativeBetty Unger2,74514.20%43.63%2
Progressive ConservativeJim Silye2,36012.21%37.51%5
Progressive ConservativeDavid Usherwood2,23211.54%35.48%6
 IndependentLink Byfield2,09410.83%33.29%4
Progressive ConservativeCliff Breitkreuz1,8539.58%29.46%3
 IndependentTom Sindlinger1,5888.21%25.24%9
Alberta AllianceMichael Roth1,1305.84%17.96%7
Alberta AllianceVance Gough1,1095.74%17.62%8
Alberta AllianceGary Horan1,0415.39%16.55%10
Total Votes19,335100%
Total Ballots6,2913.07 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined1,826

Voters had the option of selecting 4 Candidates on the Ballot

Plebiscite district results[edit]

1948 Electrification Plebiscite[edit]

District data for the 1948 Electrification Plebiscite

Option AOption B
Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being continued by the Power Companies?Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being made a publicly owned utility administered by the Alberta Government Power Commission?
2,624     64.31%1,456     35.69%
Province wide result: Option A passed.

1957 liquor plebiscite[edit]

1957 Alberta liquor plebiscite results: Banff-Cochrane[26]
Question A: Do you approve additional types of outlets for the
sale of beer, wine and spirituous liquor subject to a local vote?
Ballot ChoiceVotes%
Yes2,32478.33%
No64321.67%
Total Votes2,967100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined37
6,237 Eligible Electors, Turnout 48.16%
Question B1: Should mixed drinking be allowed
in beer parlours in Calgary and the surrounding areas?
Ballot ChoiceVotes%
Yes11587.12%
No1712.88%
Total Votes132100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined0
242 Eligible Electors, Turnout 54.55%

On October 30, 1957 a stand-alone plebiscite was held province wide in all 50 of the then current provincial electoral districts in Alberta. The government decided to consult Alberta voters to decide on liquor sales and mixed drinking after a divisive debate in the Legislature. The plebiscite was intended to deal with the growing demand for reforming antiquated liquor control laws.[27]

The plebiscite was conducted in two parts. Question A asked in all districts, asked the voters if the sale of liquor should be expanded in Alberta, while Question B asked in a handful of districts within the corporate limits of Calgary and Edmonton asked if men and woman were allowed to drink together in establishments.[26] Question B was slightly modified depending on which city the voters were in.[26]

Province wide Question A of the plebiscite passed in 33 of the 50 districts while Question B passed in all five districts. Banff-Cochrane voted overwhelmingly in favor of the plebiscite. The district recorded a slightly above average voter turnout, being a couple points above the province wide 46% average.[26] The landslide in favour of Question A was attributed to recognition of the tourist industry in Banff and the national parks.

Banff-Cochrane also voted on question B1 with a number of residents lying inside the electoral district within the corporate limits of Calgary. Residents voted for mixed drinking with a super majority. Turnout for question B was also quite high.[26]

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